Pakistan Communications Profile



country overview

Television: The biggest change in the Pakistan media landscape has been in the television market. The state-run Pakistan Television Corporation still operates six terrestrial channels, but residents with cable and satellite access can watch more than 90 private television stations

Radio: Radio continues to be a crucial conduit for communicating with Pakistanis in certain areas of the country. This is particularly the case in rural areas and less economically developed provinces.

Mobile Communications: Pakistan, like many other developing countries, has seen an explosion in its mobile market in recent years, it could be used as a medium to reach Pakistanis in more remote regions where TV and radio are less effective.

Media Environment and Development: For many scholars, the Pakistani media environment is a testament to the power of independent outlets to incite social and political change, even though this was not the intention of the Pakistani government when it opened the door for such media to exist.

Internet: Pakistan has yet to see a concentrated boost in internet access and use beyond its major urban centers. However, it has already proven to be an important political tool.

Newsprint: Pakistan has a large and diverse newspaper industry, ranging from large Urdu papers to local vernacular publications. In major urban centers their popularity is only surpassed by television.

articles in focus

Read our special focus articles for an in depth analysis of the news and information media environment in Pakistan

NEWS TELEVISION: WHO IS WATCHING?
 

NEWS RADIO: WHAT CHOICES DO SOME PAKISTANIS HAVE? 

ATTITUDES TO NEWS AND INFORMATION

HIGH NEWS CONSUMERS: A PROFILE 

RELIGIOUS MEDIA CONTENT: A CABLE PHENOMENON

Media Outlet Matrix

Brief descriptions and rankings of Pakistan's top broadcast media and internet outlets

Popular Radio Stations

Popular TV Stations

 

Communication Habits by Demographic Group

Linguistic and Regional Diversity:  Pakistan is a multicultural, multilingual and ethnically diverse society that also hosts one of the largest refugee populations in the world. In addition, there is a fair amount of geographic diversity across the country, as well as differing levels of education, literacy and socio-economic development, which significantly affect media and communication habits.


Age: Access to nearly all media (television, radio, print and internet) show a slight negative correlation with age- use decreases as age increases. In terms of topic of interest on radio, those younger than 35 show less interest in news and political issues compared to the two older age groups.


Gender: Literacy, language and socio-economic role issues have a direct effect on womens' access and use of media and ICTs. Attitudes about women’s interaction with technology are also another reason for preventing access to women. Many with conservative opinions believe that the vulgarity on television shows would negatively influence women, and that mobile phones would give women secret access to nefarious influences (such as males).

Socio-Economic Factors: Fifty two percent of the survey respondents identified themselves as illiterate; making literacy and lack of education a significant issue in Pakistan. In addition, due to low levels of development and lack of opportunities, a high education does not necessarily translate into higher income levels.