Liberia Country Profile


country overview

Introduction:  Liberia is a country undergoing a massive transition. After 14 years of civil war, the country is attempting to rebuild structurally and socially. Liberia’s civil war devastated not only the country’s population and infrastructure, but also most major businesses. 

Radio: After the  Liberian civil war, much of the broadcast sector was in shambles and in need of major repair, but domestic and international organizations have made significant efforts to expand both the private and non-profit radio markets.

Television: In a country still suffering socio-economically from a 14-year civil war, most Liberians have insufficient home access to either electricity or disposable income for televisions in the home.

Newsprint: The status of Liberia’s newsprint industry reflects that of the post-conflict country itself. For a number of reasons, print circulation remains limited to areas within and surrounding the capital Monrovia.

Media Environment: Liberia’s media environment is expanding even as it struggles with economic and political constraints. The number of registered newspapers and radio stations (many of them community stations) is on the rise despite limited market potential.

articles in focus

Read our special focus articles for in-depth analysis of Liberia's information and media environment

COMMUNITY RADIO A VITAL RESOURCE FOR LIBERIANS

ACCESSING NEWS AND INFORMATION IN LIBERIA

LIBERIANS GIVE THEIR OPINION ON QUALITY NEWS AND INFORMATION

Media Outlet Matrix

Brief descriptions and rankings of Liberia's top broadcast media outlets

Popular Radio Stations

Popular TV Stations

 

Communication Habits by Demographic Group

Regional Diversity: Liberia has stark regional differences in media/ICT use and access, mainly between the central part of the country (where most urban/peri-urban areas are) and the largely rural north and south. Thus, for  this analysis, we divide the country’s 15 counties geographically into central, south and north groupings and highlight the differences between them.



Socio-Economic Factors: About half of the population in Liberia suffer extreme poverty. In addition, close to 45 percent of the population is not literate. We see some correlation between high access and use of media/ICTs (particularly for televisions as well as mobile phones and internet connections) with high levels of income and educational attainment.


Women: In terms of media and communication use and access, gender does not seem to be a limiting factor in Liberia. Men and women of the same socio-economic status and regional location appear to have generally equal access to all main mediums and periodic use of them is nearly identical.

The real differences are seen with different levels of access and use for women across regions and locations within the country. A woman’s access to media and technology in Liberia is linked to her location and her socio-economic status.